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Largest U.S. Tax-Evasion Case – Billionaire Must Stand Trial

It was recently decided that Robert Brockman will be mandated to stand trial regarding the largest tax evasion case against an individual in United States history.  Brockman was trying to leverage his dementia to be declared incompetent for trial.

Why is Brockman Facing Trial

This tax evasion case ties back to a 39 count indictment that charged Robert T. Brockman, the Chief Executive Officer of an Ohio-based software company with tax evasion, wire fraud, money laundering, and various other charges back in 2020.  All of the charges stem from an alleged decades-long scheme to conceal approximately $2 billion in income from the IRS as well as a scheme to defraud investors in the software company’s debt securities.

Trial Progresses

Brockman’s lawyers failed to argue that his progressive dementia, caused by Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease had recently worsened to the point of incompetency, they also stated they will be filing a new claim.  U.S. District Judge George C. Hanks Jr. denied the appeal made by Brockman’s team stating, “The court finds that despite Brockman’s recent health problems, the government has met its burden of establishing that Brockman is competent to stand trial.”

Testing conducted on Brockman shows he is exaggerating his symptoms as Hanks stated that the defendant’s “cognitive abilities are not as poor as reflected by his cognitive test results” and that he is, “malingering to avoid prosecution.” It was also made clear that Brockman would need to stand trial as Hanks’ ruled, “The court finds that despite Brockman’s recent health problems, the government has met its burden of establishing that Brockman is competent to stand trial.”

gavel

Wrap Up

The 39 count indictment charge Brockman with hiding income through a complex web of offshore entities that included a Bermuda trust and multiple Swiss bank accounts.  The majority of the income comes from investments with Vista Equity Partners, the private equity firm that Brockman helped launch in 2000.  On top of the criminal charges, a separate battle is being had with the IRS, which is claiming Brock owes over $1.4 billion in back taxes, interest, and penalties.  While the legal battles still have to play out, it is clear that Brockman is getting pressure from all sides.

 
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